ESE 135: Topics in Atmosphere and Ocean Dynamics (Spring 2019)

This course explores the scientific basis of anthropogenic climate change. We will read the original papers that established the scientific foundation for the climate change forecast. Starting with Fourier’s description of the greenhouse effect, we trace the history of the key insights into how humanity is perturbing the climate system. The course is based on “The Warming Papers,” edited by David Archer and Raymond Pierrehumbert. Participants take turns presenting and leading a discussion of the papers and of Archer and Pierrehumbert’s commentary. (Course website)

ESE 131a: Physical Oceanography I (Winter 2019)

This course gives an introduction to the fluid dynamics of the world ocean. Starting from the equations of motion, approximate models are formulated to understand the observed circulation and how the ocean might respond to different forcing conditions in past and future climates. Topics include Ekman boundary layers, wind-driven gyres, thermocline theory, baroclinic instability of mean currents, mesoscale eddies, dynamics of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, surface gravity waves, tides, and inertia-gravity waves. (Course website)

ESE 131: Physical Oceanography (Winter 2018)

This course gives an introduction to the fluid dynamics of the world ocean. Starting from the equations of motion, approximate models are formulated to understand the observed circulation and how the ocean might respond to different forcing conditions in past and future climates. Topics include Ekman boundary layers, wind-driven gyres, thermocline theory, baroclinic instability of mean currents, mesoscale eddies, dynamics of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, tides, inertia–gravity waves, small-scale mixing, the circulation of the deep ocean, and meridional overturning. (Course website)